"I can’t exactly describe how I feel but it’s not quite right. And it leaves me cold."

The Love of the Last Tycoon, F. Scott Fitzgerald

"I am the foam that sweeps and fills the uttermost rims of the rocks with whiteness; I am also a girl, here in this room."

The Waves, Virginia Woolf

"I felt a tremendous distance between me and everything real."

Hunter S. Thompson

"One of my troubles is, I never care too much when I lose something."

The Catcher in the Rye, J.D. Salinger

"And I can’t be running back and forth forever between grief and high delight."

Franny and Zooey, J.D. Salinger

"September 22. Nothing."

Diaries 1914-1923, Franz Kafka

"When a girl feels that she’s perfectly groomed and dressed she can forget that part of her. That’s charm. The more parts of yourself you can afford to forget the more charm you have."

F.Scott Fitzgerald

"I realised that you had no power over me, that it was not you alone who were my lover but the entire earth. It was as if my soul had extended countless sensitive feelers, and I lived within everything, perceiving simultaneously Niagara Falls thundering far beyond the ocean and the long golden drops rustling and pattering in the lane"

Sounds, from The Stories of Vladimir Nabokov

"But I would never kiss anyone who doesn’t burn me like the sun."

Jens Lekman

"

The Skin Horse had lived longer in the nursery than any of the others. He was so old that his brown coat was bald in patches and showed the seams underneath, and most of the hairs in his tail had been pulled out to string bead necklaces. He was wise, for he had seen a long succession of mechanical toys arrive to boast and swagger, and by-and-by break their mainsprings and pass away, and he knew that they were only toys, and would never turn into anything else. For nursery magic is very strange and wonderful, and only those playthings that are old and wise and experienced like the Skin Horse understand all about it.
“What is REAL?” asked the Rabbit one day, when they were lying side by side near the nursery fender, before Nana came to tidy the room. “Does it mean having things that buzz inside you and a stick-out handle?”

“Real isn’t how you are made,” said the Skin Horse. “It’s a thing that happens to you. When a child loves you for a long, long time, not just to play with, but REALLY loves you, then you become Real.”

“Does it hurt?” asked the Rabbit.

“Sometimes,” said the Skin Horse, for he was always truthful. “When you are Real you don’t mind being hurt.”

“Does it happen all at once, like being wound up,” he asked, “or bit by bit?”

“It doesn’t happen all at once,” said the Skin Horse. “You become. It takes a long time. That’s why it doesn’t happen often to people who break easily, or have sharp edges, or who have to be carefully kept. Generally, by the time you are Real, most of your hair has been loved off, and your eyes drop out and you get loose in the joints and very shabby. But these things don’t matter at all, because once you are Real you can’t be ugly, except to people who don’t understand.”

“I suppose you are real?” said the Rabbit. And then he wished he had not said it, for he thought the Skin Horse might be sensitive.

But the Skin Horse only smiled.

"

The Velveteen Rabbit, Marjery Williams